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Home > Shop Tips > Grizzly G0704 Metalworking Mill Unboxing and Setup: Safely Done with One Person

Grizzly G0704 Metalworking Mill Unboxing and Setup: Safely Done with One Person

Tyler shows how he safely unboxed and set up a G0704 mill without the help of a second person.

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How Easy?
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Summary : It turns out with the proper equipment is easy, quick, and safe to unbox a small hobby milling machine!

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A while back Barry and I got a wild hair and spent $100 in gas to drive to Grizzly headquarters to save ourselves $100 in shipping …

It was a fun trip and worth the gas. We returned with two identical G0704 metalworking mills (0ne for each of us) so I guess we saved $100 each in shipping. Anyway, we un-crated Barry’s mill while it was still in the back of his truck and used brute force (our two tired backs) to lift the mill off of the palate and onto the mill stand. Since the palat was tailgate height it was pretty easy to transfer the mill from the bed of the truck to the mill stand. The process worked pretty well and wasn’t to difficult, but it would have been easy for one of us to slip, smash a finger, or pull a muscle.

And since I’m slightly less manly than Barry I required gloves so that my soft, girlie, touch-a-keyboard-all-day hands wouldn’t be harmed in the unboxing. Which gave Barry something to chide me about. Ruthlessly. Like any good friend would.

When it came time to set my own mill up I wanted to see if I could do it by myself easily and safely. It turns out it was easy!

All I needed was a chain hoist, a lifting strap, and something to anchor it to. In my case I have an attachment point right in the ceiling of my garage which is meant to be used to lift engines out of cars. Plenty strong enough for a 300 pound mill. If I hadn’t had this handy feature in the ceiling of my garage I would have resorted to building a wooden gantry.

I filmed the process and thought you all might like to see how easy it can be to set up a small mill with the proper lifting equipment and a little planning.

Some safety notes:

  • If you build a gantry, make sure you do the math and overbuild for the weight of the mill.
  • Make sure you know the capacity of the strap your using. If unknown, buy a proper strap.
  • If your lifting strap is used or old, check it for tears or frayed edges. Add a second backup strap if necessary.
  • Keep your hands, feet, children, and pets away from the underside of the mill at all times to avoid pinching or crushing if your strap or hoist fails.
  • This list isn’t exhaustive. Take your time and use some common sense.

So how do I like the mill so far?

Honestly I haven’t had a chance to play with it yet. But once I do I’ll be sure to post a review.

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About Tyler

Tyler is a hobby machinist and 3D printing aficionado. He teaches computer programming and web development at Highline near Seattle. Tyler founded Projects In Metal in 2008 because he was frustrated by the lack of free plans available for hobby machinists.

8 comments

  1. Vut a zooper cool vedeo Tyler. You are such a great video maker person. The nylon lifting slings you are using are very good quality. I have the same one and it is very well made. Thanks for taking the time to make this fine video for people new to the G0704, and thanks for helping me set mine up. I wish I had been there to help you set yours up.

     

    Barry

  2. I find the justification for the purchase of the chain hoist ironic, because in canada the expense for medical care and tools is reversed with the exception of time off work. As an alternative to hoisting you could disassemble the components then assemble it on the stand. 

  3. barryjyoung said
    Vut a zooper cool vedeo Tyler. You are such a great video maker person. The nylon lifting slings you are using are very good quality. I have the same one and it is very well made. Thanks for taking the time to make this fine video for people new to the G0704, and thanks for helping me set mine up. I wish I had been there to help you set yours up.

    Barry

    Damn, I knew I kept using the wrong term for the sling. I hate that. Yell

    Then again, with as much trouble as I was having with calling the mill a lathe I’m lucky I didn’t call it “this purple flat rope thingy”. Laugh

    I tried to edit the video of your mill’s unboxing but it’s 4 hours long and iMovie keeps crashing when I try to import it. I’m giving up until I get a chance to upgrade my hard drive to a larger one with more cache.

     

  4. Alexander m said
    I find the justification for the purchase of the chain hoist ironic, because in canada the expense for medical care and tools is reversed with the exception of time off work. As an alternative to hoisting you could disassemble the components then assemble it on the stand. 

    Yea, down here we have to worry about bankrupting ourselves with medical bills. But even with good insurance (or free insurance) I’d prefer to spend a little on safety equipment. Getting hurt is never fun, regardless of how much it hurts the pocket book. It does … however, give oneself a good excuse to stay home and watch sports …

     

  5. Hi Tyler,

    After battling my old Makita Planer/Jointer for a while (my friend says my shop looks like an antique shop).  For some reason it just won’t cut a true edge no matter how I tried  to adjust it. In woodworking a straight edge is a high priority.

     

    I decided to spring for a new Powermatic long bed 6″ jointer with the helical cutterheads.  The Planer part of the Makita works fine now after replacing the feed rollers at $300 but parts are almost impossible to find.  I was lucky enough to pick up a set on ebay. When the rubber roller infeed rollers wear out I will be getting a planer as well.

    More information about 1791279DXK

     

    My task was similar to yours but I had to get it upstairs.  Fortunately I had my lift, so I slid it off the pickup bed onto the lift, got it to the second floor, pulled it to the position I wanted and used a similar approach to yours.  I used a safety belt to grab it and with my hoist I did basically the same thing as you did.  It worked great. Chain hoists are one of my favorite things useful for many things even stretching fence.  I find them a lot easier to control than a come along.

     

    I am looking forward to the helical cutter heads and the fact that when they dull you just rotate them for a new set. 

     

    Jim

     

  6. I wish I had a fork lift. I don’t have a place to store one, but when you need one they really come in handy. I should check to see what they cost to rent. We might be moving this summer and it would be great to be able to lift my equipment into the back of a UHaul rather than trying to rig up a wooden gantry.

  7. About a year ago I looked at a combination saw/planer/jointer/shaper/mortiser.  It was made in Italy and weighed over eight hundred pounds. It was three phase and had two motors.  It was huge. 

    In thinking about moving it I ran across a trailer that hydraulically squatted for loading.  It was at Beehive Rentals in Eugene.  It was about four inches high when lowered.

    Ultimately I chickened out.  Combo tools can have their own problems.

    You might check to see if something like the lowering trailer that is available in your locale.  Lifting and lowering are the challenges.

    There is one good thing about moving–you tend to get rid of unwanted things.

  8. Yea, I rented a truck with a lift gate to bring my Sunnen honing machine home (600 pounds). But it was a short truck, not big enough to haul everything else we’d need to pack for the move. I need the big daddy from UHaul. If I was better at actually throwing things away I might not need the biggest moving truck on the planet … but I’m a packrat. I think I rented from Penske. I’ll see if they have a longer truck when I go to move. Good idea!